Posts Tagged 'kitchen remodeling'



Remodeling Relationships

Every strong personal relationship requires patience and compromise. Remodeling your home requires the same positive attitude. The best relationships grow out of challenges that are faced as a team. The best remodeling results come from a team effort. Get your team prepared for the challenge of remodeling by seeking good advice and it will be a wonderful design journey.

Have you checked out HOUZZ? You’ll find lots of remodeling ideas and helpful information, like this:

Here’s a small excerpt:

Many of the survey’s respondents suggested divvying up responsibilities so each person has a say in the creative process. “I do most of the decorating decisions, but my husband picks the TV that will go on the wall, complete with speakers or a particular fireplace that he likes,” one respondent said. “He gets his say without feeling the need to get involved with my area.”

“We early on decided to assign departments to each other based on our strengths,” another said. “I am Negotiations, Logistics, Procurement, Paint and Design; he is Health & Safety, Food & Drink, Dirty Jobs and Heavy Lifting.”

When you’re ready, we hope you’ll check out kitchenviews.com to get the professional help to guide you through your design journey.

Kitchen Views – where the designers are pros, and the views are yours

kitchenviews.com
1-508-DESIGNS
Serving the New England region

Berenson’s 3 Steps to Choosing the Right Cabinet Hardware

Berenson's 3 Steps to Choosing the Right Cabinet Hardware

You don’t want to rush your decision on cabinet hardware. It may seem like a small thing, but your choices will affect the everyday usability of your cabinetry and influence future changes.

Decorative hardware runs the gamut from simple knobs and pulls to unusual shapes to antique reproductions. Understated, stylish or attention-grabbing—it’s all a matter of finding the look that fits your personal style, and the shape that will fit your needs.

You may want to consider how much use a cabinet knob or pull will get. How will it feel each time you pull on it? Read more on our website.

Kitchen Views recommends Berenson decorative hardware for their huge selection of hardware in materials, finishes, sizes and styles to enhance the appearance of cabinets and furniture. Berenson recommends narrowing hardware into a manageable selection, which is crucial to the decision making process.

STEP 1 | Identify the Project Style | When it comes to choosing decorative hardware the number of options can be overwhelming. Their design style segmentation is extremely helpful. Click below to find more about these styles:

Berenson Transitional Style decorative Hardware

Classic Comfort: Casual, Refined, Transitional

Berenson Modern Style decorative hardware

Uptown Appeal: Sleek, Modern, Contemporary

Berenson Traditional Style decorative hardware

Timeless Charm: Formal, Balanced, Traditional

Berenson Artisan Style decorative hardware

Artisan Inspired: Detailed, Craftsmanship, Artisan

Step 2Request Samples | It can be very difficult to choose hardware without physically seeing it in person. Photos may not always accurately represent the size and color of a piece of hardware. Kitchen Views showrooms have a wide selection of decorative hardware. You can also ask the designer to order a special sample.

Step 3Confirm Your Hardware Choice | The ultimate way to confirm a hardware decision is to place the hardware directly on the cabinetry within the actual design space.

Berenson sample clip for decorative hardware

A complimentary sample clip ships with every Berenson sample request. Use this innovative clip to slide hardware samples directly onto your cabinetry to get an early look at the final product before the commitment of drilling holes.

Discuss your decorative hardware needs and desires with your Kitchen Views designer so that this personalized finishing touch will make you happy for years to come.

Kitchen Views | Where the designers are pros and the views are yours

Do It Yourself vs. Hiring a Pro

Image of woman's thought bubbles dreaming of a new kitchen.

Want your dream kitchen without the nightmares? Hire a pro.

How many times have you ever thought about remodeling or changing something in your home, but felt a little intimidated? It seems the more you talk about your project idea to friends and family, you get a rainbow’s wide spectrum of “You can do that yourself,” to “I can help you with that,” or “Call so-and-so. They do that kind of work, on the side. You’ll save some money.”

While you may be feeling ambitious and confident with the DIY advice you’re hearing, take time to really think about the scope of the work that will need to be done to complete your project perfectly, as well as the budget you’re going to set aside for it. Everyone offering you suggestions will have the best intentions for you and share your excitement, and will undoubtedly be as anxious to see the finished project as you are to show it.

Hiring a reputable, professional contractor may offer you peace of mind while you are in the midst of your project, and save you money, in the long run. You will need to consider the ability of those you choose to help you, whether it is a professional contractor or someone else. Choosing to forgo hiring a professional contractor may end up more costly than you expected. Click here to read this article from Cultivate about how just purchasing a new stove created costly turmoil for this homeowner.

We, here at Kitchen Views and National Lumber, sell more than just building supplies. In fact, our professionals help you plan out your project and, perhaps, alert you to issues you may not anticipate. We have everything in building materials PLUS the services you deserve!

Do you want a low maintenance kitchen when you remodel?

Schrock Thermafoil White Cabinetry

Schrock Thermofoil White Cabinetry

An important consideration when planning to remodel your kitchen is how much time you plan to spend cleaning and maintaining the cabinetry. It will only look beautiful for years to come if you care for it on a regular basis. With today’s hectic lifestyles, few people want to spend their precious free time cleaning. Of course, if you can afford it, you could hire someone to do this work. But for the moment, let’s say that’s not an option.

White cabinetry is very popular, and one type of white cabinetry is particularly easy to clean. Thermofoil cabinets are an easily maintained product. Sleek and smooth-surfaced, Thermofoil cabinetry from Schrock offers a sophisticated appearance along with exceptional durability and ease of maintenance for today’s hard-working kitchen. You should be aware that White and Cashmere color may change slightly over time, depending on environmental conditions.

Thermofoil is a process where heat and pressure are used to bond a thin layer of PVC (Polyvinyl Chloride) film to a shaped and glued component made from MDF (medium density fiberboard). The result is a seamless surface that covers a panel’s face and edges. The component back uses a white, seamless melamine surface – excellent for easy cleaning.

Cleaning guidelines from Schrock Cabinetry:
A soft cotton cloth dampened with warm water is usually sufficient to clean your cabinets. If more thorough cleaning is required, please use a fresh solution of mild hand dishwashing liquid mixed with warm water. After cleaning, wipe all surfaces with a clean, damp cloth. Dry immediately using another soft, clean cloth. Click here to read more, such as cleaning products to avoid.

Next time, we’ll talk about easy to clean and maintain countertop material.

Kitchen Views
www.kitchenviews.com

Kitchen Remodeling: It’s A Process

Click here for the Kitchen Views "Getting Started" page

If you add “renovating/remodeling the kitchen” to your to-do list on a Friday, don’t expect to cross it off by the end of the weekend.  The average kitchen from start to finish takes about 3 – 6 months, sometimes even longer.

Start with collecting ideas about what you want your kitchen to look and feel like.  When looking through magazines, tear out any picture that has something you like in it, whether it is a cabinet color, door style, backsplash or layout.  It makes it easier to explain the look you want when you sit down with a designer.

Next you want to think about how you use your kitchen.  Think about your current kitchen and what you love and hate about it.  What do want in your new kitchen?  More counter space?  More storage?  Do you entertain?  Are you a one or multi-cook family?  Do you need space to store several small appliances?  Does your kitchen need to include an eating area?  These are just some of the questions that a designer will go over you with when you sit down to discuss layout.

Appliance and cabinet selection coincide with designing the layout.  You should have a good idea of what appliances you want to use in your kitchen when you sit down with a designer.

You may go through several renditions of the design of your kitchen.  The more intricate the design, the longer the process may take.  Once you finalize your layout, your cabinets can be ordered.  Depending on the line of cabinets you are using, lead time for delivery can be anywhere from 2-14 weeks.  Stock cabinets are available much quicker.  The average lead time for semi-custom and custom cabinets is anywhere from 6-14 weeks.

Preparation!  Renovating or remodeling a kitchen involves a lot of details.  The more prepared you are, the better off you will be!

To help, we have a page called “Getting Started” on the Kitchen Views website. You’ll find a PDF there that gives ten tips for getting started and another that gives measurement guidance. Click here to check it out!

How to Stay Sane in the Midst of A Major Kitchen Renovation Project

“How to Stay Sane in the Midst of A Major Kitchen Renovation Project”
by Pam Kuliesis

Kitchen Remodeling in Progress

Let’s face it – while the rewards are great and the idea exciting, the process can be daunting.

At Kitchen Views, where the designers are pros and the “Views” are yours, you will be in great hands as you head down the path toward a brand new kitchen.

Doing a major renovation project is a journey. All great journeys require planning, preparation and a good map. Your kitchen designer will be there to help you draw you the map.

Patience is a virtue – a difficult concept to grasp in this day and age of well choreographed HGTV episodes. Rely on your designer and your installer to give you a realistic time table and know that unexpected problems and unforeseen roadblocks are going to happen. Stay flexible. There are a lot of factors that go into setting a time table. While our professionals can give you a pretty good idea – know that there are a lot of moving targets. Things can change quickly, be prepared for the time “table” to become a time “estimate”.

Along the way minor details may not workout as planned due to issues you can’t control. Don’t get hung up on the little things. Be creative. Work with your designer and your installer to find solutions to whatever pops up that will enhance your beautiful new kitchen.

My husband and I are almost finished with a major renovation that involved 3 rooms – kitchen, pantry and master bath. The excitement, the apprehension, and the fleeting moments of frustration, are still pretty fresh.

Pam's Kitchen Cabinets Being Installed

I say “almost” finished because while the major components – cabinets, counter tops, new appliances and new floors, fresh paint, are all done, there are still a lot of little things left to do – back splashes to be tiled, trim to be painted and put back in place and a bathroom tub surround I still have to decide what to do with. Three months, three rooms, a lot more storage… so much new storage that I can’t figure out what I did with my favorite coffee mug.

You will be without your sink and possibly your range and refrigerator, basically without your kitchen for awhile, possibly for weeks, during the installation. This will be inconvenient. There are ways to get through it.  Think of it as camping… but with better sleeping arrangements.

Here are some of my favorite survival tips:

  • Once your cabinets have arrived and the installation is scheduled, clean out your old cabinets a few days before the tear out.
  • Take your time. Pretend you’re moving – label the boxes meticulously.  It will make unpacking go much quicker.  Also, you may need to find that cork screw or bottle opener – you are probably going to need it.
  • Take this opportunity to clean out the dust collectors – donate the collection of small appliances your aunt has been sending you every birthday that you’ve never even opened and are just taking up space. Toss the ratty 10 year old plastic containers that you can’t find the tops for.  Throw out the accumulation of twist ties that have been working their way to the back of the drawer for years, you will never use them.
  • Find a place for the microwave to hang out and create a “temporary kitchen” around it.
  • Stock up on paper goods.   The less you have to wash dishes in the tub the better.
  • Make sure your collection of take-out menus is up to date and close at hand.
  • Stock a cooler with ice for the perishables. Or do what we did – park the fridge in the foyer.  It took me days to not head out there when I needed something after it was back in place.
  • If you plan to move the cooking outdoors to the grill – make sure you have enough propane for the duration.
  • Check your local supermarket fliers for prepared foods that you can purchase daily and help you prepare healthy meals.

During the installation, keep your designer’s phone number on speed dial and try to stay available to the installer.  There will be unforeseen issues along the way that will need to be dealt with and decisions that will need to be made.  During our granite installation one long wall was found to be bowed.  The installer needed to break through a small section of the sheet rock to get the top flush.  I don’t know what, if anything, would have been done if we hadn’t been there to give permission.  It’s much better to be a part of the decision making, understanding why something needs to be done differently than planned instead of having the decision made (or not made) for you and wondering what happened after everyone is gone.

Keep your eye on the prize – waking up and walking into your beautiful new kitchen.

For me, when all is said and (nearly) done, and I’m humming and cooking, my favorite chili recipe is simmering and the crusty rolls are baking, the journey is a warm memory. The glitches and bumps are long forgotten.

Now, where is that mug…?

Kitchen Remodeling Near Completion

Pam Kuliesis
Kitchen Views at National Lumber
71 Maple St
Mansfield, MA 02048
(508) 339-8020

Don’t Fear MDF

Traditional vignette with cabinetry containing MDF

Would you have ever guessed that MDF could belong in a high-end kitchen?

“Don’t Fear MDF” by John Allen

When looking into painted cabinets, you will often find that the center panel on a painted door will be made of a material called MDF, or Medium Density Fiberboard. I have found that some customers that come through my showroom are resistant to the idea that part of the door would not be comprised of “real” wood. There are a number of benefits to such a product, and in most cases, it is a superior material to use in the panel for a cabinet door.

MDF is made from wood fiber and similar recycled products like paper and cardboard pulp. This material is mixed with resins and then pressed into sheets under very high pressure. The finished product is cut and milled into door panels the same way as a hardwood panel.

MDF is a strong and stable product. It does not swell and shrink with seasonal changes in humidity. As a result, door panels will not end up with unpainted areas showing during the dry winter months. MDF is much denser than particle board. Painted wood panels will show splits from time to time while the surface of an MDF panel will stay smooth and flat.

The only time where MDF is not used for a cabinet door’s center panel is when the door features an “antiqued” look where some of the painted finish has holes or areas that have been sanded through. When the material under the painted finish is visible, the panel must be the same wood as the frame of the door.

The rest of the time, there is no need to be worried about MDF. A customer who wants a painted finish for their cabinet door will have a better looking and more stable product with MDF panels. Also, since the manufacture of MDF uses wood that would otherwise be wasted, as well as some recycled content, it is a more eco-friendly material.

John Allen, Showroom Manager
Kitchen Views at National Lumber
15 Needham St. Newton, MA 02461
617-244-8020
Email: jallen@kitchenviews.com
Web: www.kitchenviews.com

Why Remodel Now?

Spring is here and the remodeling season begins. If you’re thinking about remodeling, this indeed may be the best time, to both beautify your home and live healthier. Here are some reasons why.

From the Kitchen Views Fall 2009 Magazine:

“Deciding to remodel a kitchen is rarely a snap decision. In a tough economy the questions only multiply, whether the price tag is $2000 for a quick face-lift or $500,000 for a state-of-the-art makeover. But for many households, there’s no better time to embark on a process that will leave you with a home that’s more beautiful, easier to sell and most important of all, healthier for your entire family.


A functional, beautiful kitchen quickly becomes the focal point of home social life — and its benefits extend far beyond just aesthetics or making it easier for one person to chop onions while another is putting the finishing touches on a crème brulée.

The health benefits of upgrading your kitchen range from letting the cook offer more choices to inspiring the cook to forgo a trip to a restaurant in the first place…

And just cooking at home is a big improvement, public health researchers have found.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture, in a study on dining habits, listed several advantages to eating in: restaurant food has more calories overall; restaurant food has more of the kinds of nutrients Americans should cut back on; and restaurant food has less of the nutrients Americans need more of.

The bottom line: Researchers determined eating out was one factor in the nationwide surge in obesity.

In contrast, a first-rate kitchen invites people to cook in and dine in…

In the final analysis, one thing to remember is that your kitchen is an investment that is used day in and day out, year after year…”

Green Options: Clear As Crystal Cabinets

Kitchen with Crystal Cabinets

Kitchen Views understands that the trend towards using green products is one that is for the better of both the environment and our lifestyles. Therefore, we are proud to carry a semi-custom line of green cabinetry at each one of our showrooms.

GreenQuest by Crystal is manufactured by Crystal Cabinetry, a company with a legacy of strong environmental ethics. In addition to selling these fine environmentally-friendly cabinets, Kitchen Views has an exclusive arrangement with Crystal to design with and sell their more affordable semi-custom line using their green construction and finishes at each of our  kitchen showroom locations.

We recognize that there are a multitude of reasons a client may choose green products. Some are interested in healthier indoor air, while others are concerned with reducing environmental impact. Green building also can save money due to the efficient use of energy, water and materials. Crystal’s GreenQuest cabinet line offers multitude of options allowing customers to create their cabinetry by choosing green materials and features that are especially important to them and their projects. GreenQuest cabinets earn all of the available points for most green building ratings systems, including LEED.

You can learn more about Crystal Cabinets on the Kitchen Views website. Also, visit Crystal Cabinetry’s website for more information on their green product line. Kitchen Views showrooms also carry a wide variety of green, environmental options for countertops, including Silestone ECO. You can also find a summary of Kitchen Views’ green offerings on the Green page on our website.

What on Earth Does “Door Overlay” Mean?

Brandy Souza, Kitchen Views at National Lumber

In the language of cabinet design, what on earth does “door overlay” mean?

When speaking with a designer about renovating your kitchen, have you been asked about your preference for “door overlay”? While you are quite familiar with the current cabinets you use daily, most homeowners would just shrug their shoulders at this question. Yet it’s an important consideration when planning your new kitchen. We’re here to educate you on the available products and their construction so that you can make informed decisions.

 

Here are four common door overlays, with basic descriptions:

Framed – Full,  Framed – Partial, Inset,  Frameless

 

Framed = Full or Partial, the cabinet box face is seen around the cabinet door and drawer. This is a traditional cabinet style.

Inset = the cabinet door and drawer face are set into the cabinet box. This is a traditional furniture style.

Frameless = the cabinet box is not “framed” on the front, and only the cabinet door and drawer face are seen. This is a modern, European style.

 

Now, going beyond surface appearances, here is what the term “door overlay” indicates in the basic construction of the cabinet:

Framed cabinets have a ¾ inch hardwood frame that is attached to the sides, top and bottom and overhangs each side ¼ inch. The door sets on top of the frame. A full overlay is a larger door that leaves a small amount of face frame to be viewed. A partial overlay means that the door is smaller, revealing more of the frame. If you can stick two or more of your fingers between the doors, you have a partial overlay cabinet.

Inset cabinets are a framed cabinet that has the door inset into the frame. This provides a look more like furniture. However, changes in humidity will have an effect on the functioning of doors and drawers. In New England, humidity levels change with the seasons. Because the door is set into the frame, it can stick during summer when the wood swells in high humidity. When humidity decreases in winter, you can see spaces around the doors as the wood contracts. You will not see these problems if you control the humidity at around 50 percent year-round with the use of air-conditioning in summer and humidifiers in winter.

Frameless cabinets are essentially a box with finished front edges but no face frame. The door and drawer front completely cover the box front. This allows wider drawers and gives you full access to your cabinets with no “lip” in the way as you move items in and out.

For answers to any more of your cabinet or design questions, please call us at Kitchen Views 508.DESIGNS [337.4467].

 

Brandy L. Souza, General Manager
Kitchen Views at National Lumber
120 Welby Rd
New Bedford, MA 02745
Office: 508-990-8020 x 3163
Fax: 508-742-1498
bsouza@kitchenviews.com


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