Posts Tagged 'kitchen renovation'

Spice Up Your Kitchen

Omega Cabinetry, Blue Island in Dark Wood Kitchen

Visit a Kitchen Views showroom to see and feel the quality of the cabinetry you’re purchasing, an important aspect missing from an online shopping experience. What looks good in a picture can be disappointing when seen in person. Kitchen Views sells quality brands that will impress you when you experience them in our showrooms. The construction quality of cabinetry differs, and you want your investment in this foundational element to stand the test of time with solid construction.

Continue reading ‘Spice Up Your Kitchen’

Evaluate Your Current Kitchen – Amy Mood

Amy Mood, Designer at Kitchen Views in Mansfield, MA

You’ve been thinking for quite a while that you’d like to remodel your kitchen. Watching home remodeling shows and searching the internet for information has become your favorite pastime. You’re dreaming of a particular new cabinetry style and new countertops. Whether you select a stained wood or painted cabinet, granite or quartz countertop, there is a bigger picture to be considered first.

Woman imagining new kitchen design

For a successful renovation, it’s essential that you evaluate your current kitchen. Remodeling a kitchen isn’t just about making it pretty. What looks good on television, in a magazine, or online is mostly about the “look” of the materials, and sometimes about the work flow. All of this is intended to inspire you to make changes. But you need to focus on how you use the working areas and storage in your own home. What do you like, or not like about the current amount of counter space, storage space, and traffic flow?

Stop and think about what problem needs a solution. What in your current layout drives you crazy, or makes daily tasks feel like a big chore? What is in the current kitchen that simply gets in your way? Whether it’s small appliances that you only use occasionally or everyday clutter, there can be solutions built into the new cabinetry. Kitchen designers know about all the latest cabinetry features that are available.

Schrock Pantry Storage Cabinets

What items need to be stored for daily use (plates, glasses, plastic containers, pots & pans), seasonal use (picnic basket, cooler and BBQ accessories), or occasional use (small appliances, punch bowl and holiday dishes) etc. Taking this inventory makes you aware of when and how you use these items. You may discover that you can give away items you no longer need.

What can you absolutely not live without? Whether that’s a gas stove or an island, making this list will be vital to the design of the new kitchen. What daily tasks need special features in the new kitchen design — cooking, baking, clean-up, entertaining, homework, bill paying, etc.

Who uses the kitchen — adults, children, handicapped or elderly people? You may have heard of universal design, but thought it was only for people with physical handicaps. Actually, universal design includes features that people of all ages and abilities can enjoy every day.

Do you have pets? On the Kitchen Views website you’ll find a section dedicated to pet-friendly kitchen design. [http://www.kitchenviews.com/pet]

If all of this seems like a lot to think about, remind yourself that paying attention to all of these details now will result in a new kitchen that makes your life easier for years to come. You don’t have to come up with the solution by yourself. Describe the problem to an experienced designer and they will provide you with a solution, or options.

Take “before” photos – you’ll be amazed when you look back at them later.

Amy Mood, AKBD
Kitchen Views at National Lumber
71 Maple Street, Mansfield, MA 02048
Phone: 508-339-8020
amood@kitchenviews.com
www.kitchenviews.com

Kitchen islands encourage sharing and teaching

Children helping mother make school lunches at kitchen island

As children go back to school, every parent knows it’s time to make school lunches and do homework again. Large kitchen islands have become a favorite gathering place for families to enjoy time together while doing these daily tasks.

Involving children in meal preparation gives them important time together as a family, which not only teaches them about good nutrition, but provides them with emotional connections to each other. In our highly technological society, family time is more valuable than ever.

Young family together at kitchen island, close up

Sharing time together while doing homework is more emotionally rewarding than just learning their school lessons. Especially for young children, being sent to another room to do homework can feel like punishment. Interacting with parents while establishing good study habits can help them develop a lifelong love of learning. As children get older, they may require more solitude while studying, but they’ll be more productive because they learned these early lessons as a family.

Girl at kitchen island with young women, preparing meal in the kitchen

Kitchen islands with seating for casual meals are not just convenient. While it may make meals easier to prepare, eat and cleanup all in one place, this family gathering place is about building happy memories together.

Man teaching boy food prep at kitchen island

Building confidence is an important aspect of life skill lessons and leads to healthy independence. When children are old enough to handle a knife safely, cooking lessons get more technical. As with most learning, hands-on experience is the best way to learn.

It’s important to consider how you want your family to interact daily when planning a kitchen remodel. As a major family gathering space, the importance of a kitchen should not be underestimated. The best kitchen design is much more than the style and color of cabinetry and whether to include an island. An experienced kitchen designer will listen and learn about what works for your family. That allows them to design a living space that works well for you. Your designer will expertly handle the storage issues, appliance placement, and space layout so that you’ll simply enjoy using your kitchen for years to come.

When you’re ready to get started with the planning stage of a kitchen design, or remodel, start your research in the “Getting Started” section of our website. Then contact a Kitchen Views showroom near you to get the personalized attention you deserve.

Our designers work hard to exceed your expectations.

Contact Kitchen Views at 508-DESIGNS [337-4467] or visit our website for more information.

How to avoid kitchen design problems

Planning kitchen design and imagining finished room

In this day of endless home improvement programs convincing homeowners that they can do it themselves from what they’ve learned on television, it’s important to know that designing a kitchen takes thorough planning. We all enjoy the inspiration of seeing what others have done to improve their homes. But that is not the same as having real life experience in planning and implementing an actual home renovation.

Continue reading ‘How to avoid kitchen design problems’

Making the Case For A Tiny Kitchen

With the growing popularity of “tiny houses” with their own television shows, many people are thinking about how downsizing can free them for enjoying activities other than cleaning a regular size home. Whether you have a small condo that needs better space planning to make the best use of every inch, or find that your regular size kitchen is in chaos, careful planning can improve your everyday life.

One of our favorite contributors to the Kitchen Views blog recently retired, but her wisdom regarding good kitchen design is timeless. So we are sharing again her perspective on making the most of limited space.

“Making the Case for a Tiny Kitchen” by Pam Kuliesis
Originally published on November 26, 2013

Tiny kitchen 2020 layout by Pam Kuliesis

Tiny kitchen 2020 layout by Pam Kuliesis

After turning a corner in life, I find myself living with a teeny, tiny kitchen. It’s a U-shape space. The working triangle is about 9 feet total, no more than 3 feet between the sink and the range to the left and the sink and the refrigerator to the right and just about 3 feet between the range and refrigerator across from each other. I can stand in the center of the room and reach all three without moving my feet. I pretty much don’t even have to lean. Very tight.

At first I couldn’t imagine being able to create anything in this “Easy Bake” kitchen that would be worth serving. But, a girl’s gotta eat, and take-out gets old pretty quick.

Once I started putting stuff away I was amazed at just how much storage this little kitchen had. And then I started cooking. Everything I needed was within arm’s length. Prep time was so much faster, not having to schlep across the room for the pepper mill that, in my old kitchen, I would leave way over by the sink. Also, I’m much neater. I don’t have the luxury of moving around the kitchen leaving a messy trail behind me. I clean as I go, making the final clean up a breeze!

There are so many great kitchen storage options available from all of the quality cabinetry brands we sell. Stacked wall cabinets maximize every vertical inch. Carefully planned base cabinet configurations and storage accessories make the best use of every nook and cranny.

Kitchen Views designers have the knowledge and the tools to create great kitchens in any space, big and small. Our designers are pros and the views are yours

Kitchen Views at National Lumber
71 Maple St, Mansfield, MA 02048
(508) 339-8020
www.kitchenviews.com

Check List for Kitchen & Bath Remodeling

Brandy Souza of Kitchen Views

Kitchen Views at National Lumber enjoyed hosting our first EM NARI Networking event on April 16 along with co-host Allstate Glass. Two of our PRO Force salesmen, who specialize in working with remodelers, were there discussing current building projects.

Steven Kaitz, owner of National Lumber at the EM NARI Networking Event

Steven Kaitz (right), owner of National Lumber at the EM NARI Networking Event in the Kitchen Views showroom, Mansfield, MA

Many demonstration areas were available, including:

•  Allstate Glass frameless glass shower enclosures and back-painted glass backsplashes

•  Schrock and Dynasty representatives showed our vignettes of their cabinetry products and answered questions

•  Häfele introduced their new cabinet lighting that is installed in our two new kitchen vignettes

•  One of our Mansfield designers introduced our new cabinet re-facing program

•  Closet Factory showed their new finishes for custom closet products

Look for more photos in our Facebook and Google+ albums.

The night was filled with food, drinks and fantastic company. We had big winners too! Nancy from Masters Touch won a gift certificate to Closet factory. Dave from Home Repairs Carpentry in Norwood won a gift certificate to Allstate Glass, and Dave from Miller Construction won a Häfele tool kit and gift certificate for their product line.

But the biggest winner is the EM NARI scholarship fund. Annually, a scholarship is awarded to an immediate family member of an EM NARI member who is a high school graduating senior who has been accepted as a full-time student to an accredited college or university in any program of study. Thanks to everyone who attended we collected $800 for the scholarship fund.

Builders had a chance to see many of the new products going into kitchens now. Many of them feel the market for remodeling is strengthening. Adding these products to any renovation is sure to add value to a customer’s home.

Mike McDole speaking to a guest at the EM NARI Networking Event

Mike McDole, National Lumber’s Senior Vice President of Sales, speaking to a guest at the EM NARI Networking Event in the Kitchen Views showroom.

We are looking forward to another networking night! We invite you to check National Lumber’s website Events page, national-lumber.com/events, periodically to see what’s coming up.

In the meantime, we invite you to visit a National Lumber location near you to find out about the PRO Force Remodelers program. Feel free to visit a Kitchen Views at National Lumber showroom and speak to one of our designers about your next project.

Brandy Souza
General Manager of Kitchen Views

KBIS 2014 Items of Note from Brandy Souza

Brandy Souza of Kitchen Views

I enjoyed attending Design and Construction Week February 3–6, the combined 2014 IBS and KBIS show in Las Vegas, with some of our top customers. It was a terrific opportunity to show them the latest products and trends, plus enjoy the fine food and hospitality of Las Vegas.

Style trend to note – most of the displays show flat or recessed panel doors. Raised panel is no longer in demand.

Omega display at 2014 KBIS of TURILLA cabinetry

Omega display at 2014 KBIS of TURILLA cabinetry

I want to mention that Omega now has stainless steel inset doors. They are inset into a wood frame which would prevent the doors from sticking during high humidity levels like wood doors.

Omega display at 2014 KBIS of CALDERA cabinetry with some flip-up doors.

Omega display at 2014 KBIS of CALDERA cabinetry with some flip-up doors.

We also checked out the flip-up door. It has a mechanical device so that when a button is pressed, the flip-up door automatically closes. This is great for shorter people who can’t close the flip-up door once it is open as the handle is too high.

Masterbrands SOHO Thermofoil Woodgrain Silt and Custom Aluminum Framed Doors

Masterbrands SOHO Thermofoil Woodgrain Silt and Custom Aluminum Framed Doors

Our time at the show flew by quickly. Since there is so much to see, it helps to have a plan or at least a list of top things to see. If you’re a builder interested in attending next year, you may want to consider going for an entire week so that you can enjoy all that Las Vegas has to offer, and spend maximum time on the show floor.  Until then, or for homeowners looking for inspiration, we hope that you’ll visit one of our Kitchen Views showrooms to see our cabinetry vignettes that display a wide range of styles.

Contact Kitchen Views at 1-508-DESIGNS (337-4467) to arrange a personal consultation with a designer who will guide your design journey to a new kitchen you will enjoy for years to come.

Brandy L. Souza
Assistant General Manager
Kitchen Views at National Lumber
120 Welby Rd, New Bedford, MA 02745
Office: 508-990-8020 x3163
Fax: 508-742-1498
bsouza@kitchenviews.com

Kitchen Design & Home Improvement Go Hand in Hand. Survey results show 55% of consumers plan to do a kitchen remodel.

Amy Mood of Kitchen Views works with a client and her daughter on a kitchen remodeling project

A recent online survey done by remodelormove.com shows that American consumers are feeling more confident in spending money toward home improvement projects.  The survey had 5,000 participants who answered a range of approximately 70 questions to determine if the majority would rather move or remodel. Every participant showed interest in making some sort of improvement to their current home.  The results show consumers are willing to spend around 30% of their home’s value for the home improvements.

With long-term value being a factor in remodeling, homeowners are willing to use more expensive materials in their projects. A majority, 74% responded that they plan to hire a general contractor to do the work, rather than undertaking projects themselves. Along with hiring construction professionals, more than half of the respondents plan to hire an architect. Homeowners are planning their projects on a larger scale and are including multiple rooms, and will be better served having professionals to oversee the project.

The percentage of homeowners planning to do a kitchen remodel is right above the halfway mark at 55%. Kitchen remodels are taking precedence over baths, according to the survey, and this is where consumers are willing to invest more of their budget. Since the contemporary kitchen is the hub of family activities, this is really an investment in improving family life.

Kitchen Views at National Lumber has experienced designers to serve you through every phase of your remodeling projects. We can supply you with the building supplies you need and the services you deserve. Those services include getting to know the unique needs of your family. Your particular tastes and lifestyle are factored into the design. We strive to exceed your expectations. One of our designers will follow the project from concept to completion. Kitchen Views at National Lumber, where the designers are pros and the views are yours!

Resource: Americans Willing to Spend More to Remodel, Survey Says

Can you spot the errors? Educate yourself on “good” kitchen design.

In Paul McAlary’s post, Good Intentions, Bad Designs, he poses the question “What design errors do you see most often, either in the media or in your local market?” This is in follow up to his earlier article, Death by Kitchen Design, where he defines several examples of kitchen design gone wrong.

Some examples he describes include the range or cooktop being too close to cabinetry, a window or an entry doorway. Another hazard is having an island cooktop located too close to the edge of the island where pot and pan handles can overhang and have the potential to be knocked off the stove.

dangerous kitchen design with open space under wall cabinet

Building codes are in place to regulate safety hazards in building structures, but does that mean every design project is actually safe?

Another example he gives is about cabinetry that extends beyond the counter below or not having some other protective base beneath. In this photo of a modern kitchen you see wall storage above and drawer storage below. What’s wrong with this picture?

  • One potential hazard is the possibility of hitting one’s head on the underside of the wall cabinet after going into the lower drawers.

While this design may technically be “up to code,” the potential for danger is still there. Designing your kitchen can be exciting and scary, throughout the whole process. While working with a professional designer and professional contractors are of the utmost importance, so is your own education and vision for your new space.

As you look at different ideas, see if you are able to find instances that you think might be dangerous. Then see if any of these are designed for your new kitchen. If you find something that concerns you, don’t hesitate to tell the professionals you are working with. It’s better to address something that can be potentially harmful as soon as possible, instead of having to spend more money to fix something that may have been averted in earlier stages of the project.

Better Safe Than Sorry

hammer breaking through a wall

Have a Safe Renovation Season

With warmer weather and longer days on their way, many homeowners take advantage of the conditions to start the renovations they have been planning for a while. Whether you choose to handle the remodel on your own or opt for professional help, there’s one safety issue that should stay at the front of your mind: asbestos.

If a home was built before the 1980s, it may contain asbestos-contaminated construction products. Renovations may accidentally release asbestos into the air. If inhaled, these fibers can lead to serious diseases, such as mesothelioma and lung cancer. Once diagnosed with mesothelioma cancer, the survival rates are typically low.

On the bright side, it’s certainly possible to complete home renovations without creating any asbestos exposure hazards. Because no new kitchen or bathroom is worth a serious health risk, it’s important to take several safety precautions during the process.

How to Avoid Asbestos Exposure During Home Renovations

We know you’re excited to give your home some changes – but don’t be so excited that you overlook necessary safety measures.

These four steps can help you safely renovate your home:

  • Before touching anything, get a professional inspection. You can’t spot asbestos with your naked eye. That’s why it’s essential to have a trained asbestos inspection team take samples of potentially contaminated products, then have them tested in a laboratory. It doesn’t take long, it’s more affordable than you think, and in a best-case scenario, you won’t have to make any adjustments to your remodeling plan.
  • Develop an action plan. If the inspection does reveal asbestos in your home, you’ll need to develop an action plan for each contaminated item. Sometimes this plan is as simple as “leave it alone and tell all members of the home not to disturb it.” However, if the fibers are loose, this plan needs to be more extensive. If an asbestos-containing product in your home is friable (loose), an abatement company will need to come out and seal it off or replace it.
  • Renovate with caution. Even the most basic of construction activities has the potential to release asbestos from a contaminated product. Sawing through walls, tearing up carpet, cutting drywall and replacing tiles can all release asbestos into the air. Never perform construction on any materials that you know contain asbestos, and always have an abatement team address any threats before you begin renovations. If you hire a professional remodeling crew, make sure they’re certified to handle asbestos.
  • Choose asbestos-free home remodeling materials. Sad to say, but asbestos isn’t banned in the United States – even though it’s a known carcinogen. Roofing materials, vinyl tiles, home insulation products, and even potting soils can still contain the fibers. To keep your home free from the toxin, be sure to purchase products from brands that use alternatives.

If you follow these guidelines, you can enjoy your newly remodeled rooms without the stress of an asbestos exposure threat. However, if other experiences in your life have brought you in contact with the fibers, we can help. Our organization offers free information and patient advocate services; if you have been diagnosed with an asbestos-related disease, we can work one on one with you to help you find local doctors, treatment centers and support groups.

Faith Franz is a researcher and writer for The Mesothelioma Center. She advocates for alternative medicine and encourages cancer patients to explore all of their treatment options.

Pipes covered with asbestos

Years ago, it was common practice to insulate heating pipes in basements with asbestos. Have you seen pipes like these in your home?


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