Posts Tagged 'kitchen views warwick'

Kitchen Views Wins Best of Houzz 2017

Kitchen Views in Warwick, RI has won “Best of Design” on Houzz, the leading platform for home remodeling and design. Kitchen Views was chosen by the more than 40 million monthly unique users that compromise the Houzz community from more than one million active home building, remodeling, and design industry professionals.

Private Residence - Pawtucket, RI - Kitchen

This Pawtucket, RI kitchen designed by Lisa Zompa has been saved to over 5,000 ideabooks on Houzz

The Best of Houzz award helps homeowners identify popular and top-rated home professionals in every metro area featured on Houzz. The Kitchen Views at National portfolio includes some of the most popular images on Houzz 2016. Kitchen Views also maintains an active presence on the platform and answers questions from the millions of worldwide users who may wish to duplicate the popular style seen in the photos.

Private Residence - Pawtucket, RI - Kitchen

Lisa Zompa, designer at Kitchen Views Warwick, has over 12 years of experience in kitchen and bathroom design. Lisa has an interior design degree and joined Kitchen Views in early 2010 to serve the Rhode Island area. Lisa says “to be honored by Houzz for a second time is a great compliment. The Pawtucket kitchen was designed a few years ago so it is really nice to know that my designs appeal to a wide range of people and that this design has stood the test of time.”

Private Residence - Bristol, RI Kitchen and Bathroom

Lisa Zompa in a kitchen she designed for a home in Bristol, RI

Kitchen Views is proud to offer exceptional customer service, talented designers, exquisite showrooms, and quality products. For unlimited options, Kitchen Views offers multiple lines of custom cabinetry, decorative hardware, and stunning countertops.  Whether you want a traditional, contemporary, or “green” design, you will find it at Kitchen Views.

Vice President of Industry Marketing for Houzz, Liza Hausman, says “we’re so pleased to award Best of Houzz 2017 to this incredible group of talented and customer-focused professionals like Kitchen Views. Kitchen Views was singled out for recognition by our community of homeowners and design enthusiasts for help to turn their home improvement dreams into reality.”

Click here to visit Kitchen Views’ Houzz profile and see the popular and beautiful work of Lisa and Kitchen Views. Kitchen Views has six unique and stunning showrooms across New England.  Meet with our talented designers to be inspired in the planning and delighted in the results.

Historical Roots of the Modern Kitchen by Don James

Don James, Kitchen Views

Have you ever thought about the historical roots of the modern kitchen? As with most things in life that we take for granted today, form really does follow function.

Born and raised in historic downtown Hingham, Massachusetts, I’ve always had an affinity for elements of architectural design and aesthetics. Researching historic facts of architecture has informed my design ability. There is so much we can learn about ourselves by studying the past and the lessons learned by those who came before us.

Sioux indians (mid-1800s) gathered around the cooking fire

Sioux Indians (mid-1800s) gathered around the cooking fire

Settlers of the American West gathered around the Chuck Wagon

Settlers of the American West gathered around the Chuck Wagon

We are inherently drawn to the source of our nourishment, but most of us don’t think about it consciously. Without a building, we are drawn together around the cooking fire. This shared experience forges emotional ties. Family loyalty is strengthened by these everyday routines.

The kitchen is now truly the heart of the home, however, this wasn’t always the case. From the colonial period up until the mid-20th century, most kitchens were an afterthought in the planning of a house.  They were simple rooms predominantly for food storage and minimal food preparation. They lacked space and no one could say they were “designed.” The cooking methods and tools of the day were primitive, which left kitchens dysfunctional for centuries.

Typical kitchen in the early 1900s

Early 1900s

Typical kitchen 1920-1930

1920-1930

Typical kitchen in the 1940s

1940s

It was not until the late 19th century that iron stoves became commercialized and municipality systems for gas, water and electric became readily accessible. Once these advances took place, kitchens were poised for transition, and the kitchen industry was born.

The industrial period led to scientific studies of productivity that considered efficiency dealing with movement and spacing, from which came kitchen design concepts that took into account the process of food preparation. The stove, sink, refrigerator and counter space were identified as key work areas and were now being spaced according to a well-thought-out design for maximum efficiency.

Starting in the 1950s, household work came into vogue depicting the “perfect” middle class household. As a result, even more emphasis was placed in the kitchen. Traditionally, the kitchen had been built at the back of the house, away from living areas. The advancement in technology, flooring, lighting, etc., changed the location of the kitchen within the home.

With this new focus on kitchen appliances, and the development of suburban neighborhoods, competitiveness required that upwardly mobile families had state-of-the-art kitchens. “Keeping up with the Jones’” became a way of life. These modern appliances had become both necessities and status symbols.

With pride in their modern kitchens, families were happy to gather at the kitchen table to eat meals together, instead of in a separate dining room. Kitchens were becoming the place that brought the family together. This was the beginning of the concept of a kitchen as “the heart of the home.”

This period of rapid development from the 1950s through the end of the century saw the family gathering place being improved. With homeowners willing to invest in modern kitchens, designers explored color choices and new materials (such as the aqua blue 1960s kitchen shown below), storage options inside the cabinets, and new configurations to eating areas (such as the 1970s picture with seating around an island instead of a stand-alone table).

Typical kitchen in the 1950s

1950s

Typical kitchen in the 1960s

1960s

Typical kitchen in the 1970s

1970s

The 1980s saw a change in kitchen layouts, which most people didn’t realize was moving them out of “the heart of the home.” Kitchens began to be designed with work islands in the center, to provide more work space for meal preparations. The kitchen table got pushed to the side, or back into a designated dining room. Individuals went to their bedrooms or a designated family room and/or entertainment area during their recreation time.

Typical kitchen in the 1980s

1980s

Typical kitchen in the 1990s

1990s

How many people understood that this physical separation was creating an emotional rift in their family? There is no one factor responsible for the shift in American society. But any honest observer recognizes that we went through a turbulent period with jobs requiring relocation or frequent travel, a rise in the divorce rate and a generation that was out there trying to “find itself.” Perhaps that’s why we’ve finally seen a shift back to the importance of family, whatever form that family takes.

Today’s kitchen is the focal point and gathering place for family and friends. Kitchen islands have transitioned back to include seating for the family to gather in the kitchen, at least for casual meals. The family is also being brought together with the contemporary concept of an open floor plan. This could include a dining area as well as a family room and/or entertainment area. Parents want a line of sight to see small children playing while they do their kitchen tasks. Older children working on homework or playing video games are still “part of the family” instead of off in their bedrooms alone. The family cook may have felt separated from the family, alone behind a wall. With open concept layouts, the person preparing meals can easily converse with the family. The concept of the kitchen as “the heart of the home” has been expanded to include a larger family living area.

It’s where family bonds are made, a place where kids do homework and preparing meals with one another is a pleasant activity. Today’s kitchen is fully integrated into your lifestyle and deserves to be stylish and functional.

contemporary 2014 open concept kitchen and living area

This open concept kitchen and living area layout is a good example of what we have discussed as a contemporary style.

Traditional cabinetry details are included in this contemporary open concept kitchen.

Traditional cabinetry details are included in this contemporary open concept kitchen.

current-2014-two-islands-in-open-concept-kitchen-layout

This open concept kitchen includes two large islands, with natural flow into the family living area.

 

As you can see from these examples, there are endless variations on the theme of open concept. Your kitchen should reflect your aesthetic and your lifestyle.

Don James | Showroom Sales & Design
Kitchen Views | 3356 Post Road, Warwick, RI
djames@kitchenviews.com

Don graduated from Wentworth Institute of Technology’s Architectural Engineering Program. He began his career in 1986 hand drafting kitchens for other designers. Don’s notable skill in conceptual design has earned him a reputation as one of the areas premiere kitchen designers.

Kitchen Design Layouts: Lisa Zompa

Lisa Zompa, Kitchen Designer Blog

Creating your dream kitchen can be daunting.  One of the first things to consider is what type of layout will fit into your space.  If your space is long and narrow, then the galley kitchen layout will work best.  If the space is a large square, then a design with an island might work. If your space isn’t particularly large or small, a U-shape layout is a good possibility. Below are some examples of different kitchen layouts based on room shape.

Galley

The galley layout is used when the space is narrow.  Typically, the sink will be on one side and the cooking area will be on the other side.

U-Shape

This layout can be used a couple of different ways.  In one, the cabinets follow the perimeter of the room in a U-Shape.  The second way is more of an open concept, and is also the most common.  One of the ends will just have base cabinets and be open to the next room.  This creates a peninsula, allowing for extra seating on the other side.  This layout is typically used when there isn’t enough room for an island.

Island Design

Islands are used when the space is large enough.  When using an island in a layout, there must be 36”-48” of clearance around all four sides of the island, with 42” being the most comfortable clearance.  Islands can serve many functions.  They can be a pure working island, which means there will not be any appliances in it; some will have a prep sink, or even the main sink and dishwasher.  Others will have the cooking function.  Most will also have seating whether the island be one level or two.

While these basic layouts serve general needs, there are many possible variations for individual needs. Depending on whether this will be a family kitchen that needs to accommodate children, a baker’s kitchen that needs plenty of work space, or some other special function, you may want different options. An experienced kitchen designer can help you to create a space that meets your particular needs.

Lisa Zompa
Kitchen Views at National
3356 Post Rd, Warwick, RI 02886
Phone: 401-921-0400
Email: lzompa@kitchenviews.com
Web: www.kitchenviews.com

White Cabinetry & New England Kitchens

Lisa Zompa, Kitchen Designer Blog

Being in New England, not only are our needs different from the rest of the country, but we also have such rich history and tradition.  This makes design fun and exciting because every client is so different.  With that said, I’ve found that white cabinetry can be included in most design trends.  It is clean, classic, and timeless.  I have found that most of the clients that I work with want a white painted cabinet of some sort included in their design either for an accent piece, main part of the kitchen, island, or built-ins in a den or office.

The constant always starts off with a white painted cabinet and then goes from there.  This would include some version of white, or with a glaze. As for countertops, Black Granite or White Carrara Marble and white cabinetry with white subway tile is classic. Browns or grays also always work with corresponding tile options. Wood is always a nice touch on an island or accent piece. (Craft-Art wood countertops are a great example.)

Designer Lisa Zompa's desk at the Kitchen Views showroom in Warwick, Rhode Island, featuring white Omega Dynasty cabinets

Whatever your cabinetry or countertop needs, Kitchen Views has a wide selection of great brands and the expert advice to help you find just what will fit your needs and style.

Lisa Zompa
Kitchen Views at National
3356 Post Rd,
Warwick, RI 02886
401-921-0400
Email: lzompa@kitchenviews.com
Web: www.kitchenviews.com

Lisa Zompa: Updating Your Old Kitchen With A Fresh Look

Lisa Zompa, Kitchen Designer Blog

Are you getting tired of your current kitchen, but your existing cabinets are still in good shape? How about adding a complementary island or hutch? The trend has been going in the direction of replacing the kitchen table and chairs with an island that has added storage and seating for the family. An island, or hutch can be a great opportunity to add the function that your existing kitchen lacks without going through the expense of a new kitchen.

Islands can offer you additional countertop space for entertaining, working, and seating, while giving you added storage for pots and pans, trash, or even additional appliances. A hutch piece is a nice place to show off your china that has been stored away in some closet for years. They can also give you that furniture “WOW” piece that you have been looking for.

The hutch below adds added storage and function with the beverage center.

Lisa Zompa - Black Hutch

The island below adds color, and is multi-functional. It serves as banquet seating on one side, and has a sink on the other.

Schrock Island with contrasting cabinetry

Island with Schrock Cabinetry

The island below adds contrast to the kitchen cabinets and provides additional seating, while looking like a piece of furniture.

Crystal Cabinetry island

Island with Crystal Cabinets

Adding an island or a hutch, or both, to your existing kitchen is a cost-effective way to update your kitchen without overstretching your remodeling budget.

Lisa Zompa
Kitchen Views at National
3356 Post Rd,
Warwick, RI 02886
Phone: 401-921-0400
Email: lzompa@kitchenviews.com
Web: www.kitchenviews.com

A Festive Atmosphere in Warwick for Girls’ Night Out

On Thursday, December 9, 2010, Kitchen Views’ newest showroom in Warwick, Rhode Island participated in the Warwick Apponaug Village Girls’ Night Out. Starting at the Warwick Museum of Art, participants received a Warwick tote bag containing a map of local businesses participating in the evening. This Apponaug neighborhood event drew a good crowd visiting a number of local businesses despite the cold temperatures. Brandy Souza, Lisa Zompa and Mike Ampuja of Kitchen Views, along with National Building Products store manager Bill Lee welcomed guests. Many ladies and a few men came to Kitchen Views to enjoy the festive atmosphere, delicious treats and explore the beautiful cabinetry in our nine distinctive vignettes.

Greeting guests with appetizing treats

Greeting guests with appetizing treats

Kitchen Views hosted local inventor Barry Blair as he demonstrated his new kitchen helper, PREP N’ POP, which can be found on QVC. Throughout the evening guests had the opportunity to participate in demonstrations that were videotaped for future national advertising of the product. This handy device makes peeling vegetables easier than ever before, and you never have to actually touch the vegetable with your hands. You can see a video demonstration of the PREP N’ POP online at www.prepnpop.com

Prep N' Pop Demo with Maria Fratiello of National Lumber

Maria Fratiello of National Lumber tries out the PREP N' POP

Barry Blair had been introduced to Kitchen Views by business neighbor Kristen Girouard of RESTYLE DESIGN across the street. With visits back and forth across the street during the evening, guests enjoyed a variety of visual and palatable treats. Kristen has collaborated with Brandy Souza, Assistant General Manager of Kitchen Views, on a number of design projects. She is in the midst of renovating the Historic Tide Mill where her business is located and many materials have been supplied by National Building Products and Kitchen Views. http://www.restyledesign.com/

Dale Zwizinski, Kristen Girouard, and Brandy Souza at RESTYLE DESIGN

Dale Zwizinski, Kristen Girouard, and Brandy Souza at RESTYLE DESIGN

Visit our Facebook page to see an album of photos from the evening. We look forward to participating in future community events.

Kitchen Views at National
www.kitchenviews.com

Lisa Zompa: Types of Cabinet Glazing Techniques

Lisa Zompa, Kitchen Views Designer, Warwick, Rhode Island

Lisa Zompa, Kitchen Views at National, Warwick, Rhode Island

With 8 years of experience in kitchen and bathroom design, and an interior design degree, Lisa joined Kitchen Views in early 2010 to serve the Rhode Island area. She now works directly out of our Warwick, RI showroom. You can view Lisa’s profile here.

Who would have ever thought that there are so many decisions to make when picking out the cabinetry?  Besides the door style, wood type, and overlay (inset, framed, stained, painted), there are also glazing techniques to choose from, if you decide to do so.

Glazing is a technique used to highlight or accentuate the details of the door style you choose.  The glaze will look different as the door style changes.  It can be subtle or extremely obvious.  Glaze can be applied to either a stained or painted door.  It is usually hand applied and wiped off so every piece will not look the same.

Here is an example taken from Schrock of the same glaze combination on different door styles:

Glaze Examples - Galena and Huxley

Schrock's Galena and Huxley door styles with Amaretto Créme finish

Your choices for glazed colors will depend on the cabinet line.  Some cabinet manufacturers will offer certain color combinations and have names for those combinations. Other cabinet lines will allow you to choose a stain or paint, and then choose from a range of glaze colors.  The most common glaze colors are white, brown, pewter, and onyx.  As the cabinet lines become closer to a custom line, you will have even more choices, such as the type of glaze and how pronounced it will be. This means that they will offer a dry, wet, pen highlight, light, medium, or heavy application, to name a few.

You can find examples of Dry, Pen, and Wet Glazes and more here on the glazes page of Omega Cabinetry.

Whatever door style or glaze you choose, your Kitchen Views designer will help you to make your kitchen both beautiful and made to last.

Lisa Zompa
Kitchen Views at National
3356 Post Rd,
Warwick, RI 02886
401-921-0400
lzompa@kitchenviews.com


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